UBC’s Buddhism and Contemporary Society Program, in conjunction with the Tzu-chi Buddhist Studies Forum, Kameyama Lecture Series, and Contemporary Tibetan Studies Program, presents three lectures on Buddhism this March:

Dr. Weirong Shen, research fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies at Princeton University, will present his lecture:

Fiction in History and History in Fiction: “The Secret Meditation of Supreme Bliss” Represented and Interpreted in Various Contexts of Religion and Literature

Date: Monday, 4 March, 2013
Time: 4:30pm – 6:00pm
Place: Asian Center, Room 604, UBC Point Grey Campus

WeirongShenIn this lecture, Professor Shen reveals the complex process of how fictional stories of Tibetan tantric Buddhism became official history and how official history was again fictionalized through textual criticism. through textual criticism. Professor Shen endeavours to restore the historical fact based on the careful studies of the newly discovered Chinese translations of Tibetan tantric Buddhist texts from both the Tangut Xia and Mongol Yuan periods.


Dr. Elisabetta Porcu, the Numata Visiting Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Hawaii, will present her lecture:

Consumerism and Popular Culture in Contemporary Japanese Buddhism

Date: Thursday, 7 March, 2013
Time: 4:00pm – 6:00pm
Place: Asian Center, Room 604, UBC Point Grey Campus

PorcuIn this talk, Professor Porcu will present some results of her ongoing book project Japanese Religions, Popular Culture and the Media and focus on the ways Japanese Buddhist institutions are employing these formats for proselytization and promotional scopes together with the dynamics that lie behind and characterize such communication strategies.


Dr. Stuart Young, Assistant Professor of East Asian religions at Bucknell University, will present his lecture:

India in the Chinese Buddhist Imagination

Date: Thursday, 28 March, 2013
Time: 4:30pm – 6:00pm
Place: Asian Center, Room 604, UBC Point Grey Campus

StuartYoungIn this talk, Professor Young will discuss the ways in which Indian Buddhism was adduced and deployed in the context of medieval China. In particularly, Professor Young will examine medieval Chinese hagiographies of the ancient Indian Buddhist patriarchs, which show how Chinese Buddhists constructed paradigms of Buddhist sainthood for a world without a Buddha.

Seating for all lectures is on a first-come, first-served basis.

UBC’s Buddhism and Contemporary Society Program events are made possible by the generous support of The Tung Lin Kok Yuen Canada Foundation, in collaboration with the Institute of Asian Research and Department of Asian Studies.

This event of the Buddhism and Contemporary Society

Program is made possible by the generous support of The

Tung Lin Kok Yuen Canada Foundation, in collaboration with

the Institute of Asian Research and the Department of Asian

Studies. Additional funding provided by the Social Sciences

and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) and

the Numata Foundation.